2017 Lecture Series -- speaker bios:

Dr. J. B. Goss

J. B. Goss, PhD., R.Ph., CPS is a neuroscientist and science blogger who lectures and consults internationally on both human consciousness and neuroscience. He served as a delegate of the former International Sleep Forum in France, and served as Chair of the Freund Scholars Group. His daily blog at www.gossisms.com covers fascinating facts about nature, woodworking, philosophy, meaning of life, simple living, joy and how not to be a victim of bad people, corrupt government, and a world gone mad -- among other things!

 

Nancy DiPace Pfau

Nancy DiPace Pfau grew up in Sharon Springs, her mother's family first settled in The town in 1749. Pfau married in 1964 and lived around the world before returning to Sharon Springs on retirement in 2008. Pfau received a BA in History from Syracuse University and a Masters in the Teaching of History from Columbia University. After a 30-year teaching career in far flung schools from Tehran, Iran to California, Mississippi, Florida, and Virginia, she recently wrote Sharon and Sharon Springs: a History, published by Arcadia Press. She has been the Sharon Springs Village Historian since 2010 and is currently the editor of "The Chatter", a quarterly newsletter chronicling life in our unique little village.

 

Kat Kinsman

Kat Kinsman is Senior Editor of Food and Drinks for Extra Crispy, a food website devoted to the joys of breakfast. She is the former editor at large and former editor in chief of Tasting Table and editor for CNN.com, where she was nominated for the James Beard Broadcast Award in the TV segment category and won the 2011 EPPY best food website for CNN’s Eatocracy. Kinsman is a frequent public speaker on the topics of food and mental health. She lives in Brooklyn and Sharon Springs with her husband.

 

Dr. Richard Pfau

Dr. Richard Pfau presently teaches the history of U.S. foreign policy at Hartwick College. He earned his undergraduate degree at Hamilton College, served in the Air Force during the Vietnam War, completed a PhD in American Diplomatic History at the University of Virginia, and then enjoyed a long career in teaching and academic leadership, the last fifteen years as a college president.  His current research focuses on the influence of cultural values on foreign policy.


Jean Hanff Korelitz

Jean Hanff Korelitz is the author of the novels You Should Have Known (2014), currently being adapted as a limited-run television series; Admission (2010), which was adapted as the 2013 film of the same title, with Tina Fey, Lily Tomlin and Paul Rudd; The White Rose (2004); The Sabbathday River (1999); and A Jury of Her Peers (1996). Her sixth novel, The Devil and Webster, was published in March, 2017.

She has also written a novel for children, Interference Powder (2003), and a collection of poetry, The Properties of Breath (1989). From November 2016 – January 2017, her immersive adaptation (with Paul Muldoon) of James Joyce’s short story “The Dead”, THE DEAD, 1904, was produced by Dot Dot Productions, LLC for the Irish Repertory Theatre at the American Irish Historical Society. Dot Dot Productions (Jean Hanff Korelitz and Nina Korelitz Matza) plans a revival of THE DEAD, 1904 in late 2017 and has several other projects in development.

Born and raised in New York City and educated at Dartmouth College and Clare College, Cambridge, Korelitz lives in New York City with her husband, Irish poet Paul Muldoon, and their children. She is the founder of BOOKTHEWRITER, a New York City based service that connects authors and book groups.

Paul Muldoon

Paul Muldoon is an Irish poet and professor of poetry, as well as an editor, critic, and translator. Born in 1951 in Portadown, Co. Armagh, Northern Ireland, to Patrick Muldoon, a farm labourer and market gardener, and Brigid Regan, a schoolteacher, Paul Muldoon was brought up near a village called The Moy on the border of Counties Armagh and Tyrone. He is the oldest of three children. After studying at Queen’s University, Belfast, he published his first book, New Weather (Faber) in 1973, at the age of 21. From 1973 he worked as a producer for the BBC in Belfast until, in the mid-1980’s, he gave up his job to become a freelance writer and moved to the United States with his second wife, the American novelist Jean Hanff Korelitz. He now lives in New York City and Sharon Springs, New York.

Muldoon is the author of twelve major collections of poetry, including One Thousand Things Worth Knowing (2015), Maggot (2010), Horse Latitudes (2006), Moy Sand and Gravel (2002), Hay (1998), The Annals of Chile (1994), Madoc: A Mystery (1990), Meeting the British (1987), Quoof (1983), Why Brownlee Left (1980), Mules (1977) and New Weather (1973). He has also published innumerable smaller collections, works of criticism, opera libretti, books for children, song lyrics and radio and television drama. His poetry has been translated into twenty languages.

Muldoon served as Professor of Poetry at Oxford University from 1999 to 2004. He has taught at Princeton University since 1987 and currently occupies the Howard G.B. Clark ’21 chair in the Humanities. He has been poetry editor of The New Yorker since 2007. In addition to being much in demand as a reader and lecturer, he occasionally appears with a spoken word music group, Rogue Elephant.